Tag Archives: video gaming

Another VR Demo

While visiting my brother in Portland, I was able to give him, Michele and Seaerra the chance to try out just a little bit of the virtual reality experiences I’ve been going on and on about excitedly for months:

If you’re interested, I write about what it’s like to experience VR in this post – plus I have a longer demo video.  And for more about Microsoft’s updated Flight Simulator, see Flying All Over the Planet.

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Virtual Reality Is…

Virtual reality is… freakin’ amazing.  (At least with the new, very high resolution HP Reverb G2… see my hardware details below.)

Let me try some words first…

It’s a truly astounding and engrossing experience – an incredible, brain-fooling trick: you put on the headset and immediately you feel like you are physically somewhere else.  Rationally you know that you’re still sitting or standing in your room at home, but as you look around and up and down and see and hear this entirely different environment, rendered perfectly in sync with your head movements, it’s utterly convincing that you’re somewhere else.  Maybe you’re standing on top of Mt. Everest or hanging in space over the Earth.  It’s not at all like looking at a screen, or even a 3D movie.  It’s like being somewhere else.

Hanging in space in VR

Yes, you’re wearing this contraption on your head.  Yes, you know you can just remove the headset and see again the room you’re really in.  And yet, part of your brain is fooled.  You hold up your hands in front of your face and you see a virtual set of hands and they move and turn in sync with your physical hands. Just standing and turning around makes you feel like you’re there but then you take some steps, some actual physical steps in the real world – and you find yourself moving in this virtual world.  It suddenly becomes all the more convincing and all the more of your brain is fooled.

You crouch down and look around and your perspective changes to match.  You reach down and “pick up” an object off the virtual floor.  You can’t feel it but you can turn it over in your hands, and can set it on a table or throw it across the virtual space with a simple, natural motion. You step to the edge of a balcony and look over the side and feel the threat of vertigo.  You turn away and approach a door, reaching out for the handle and physically pull the door open, looking into the next room.  It’s dark as you step inside, so you take out your flashlight and shine it left and right into the corners of the room, trying not to be caught by surprise.

You see a zombie wake and turn towards you, moaning and shambling towards you.  He’s just a dozen virtual feet away as you grab your pistol and raise it to fire – discovering you’re out of ammo.  Unlike any game played on a flat screen, you feel like you’re actually in the same space with this menace bearing down on you.  You have to resist the instinct to physically back away – or to turn and run in panic, yanking out the cord between your headset and computer.  Instead you hold your ground, reminding yourself that this creature so clearly coming at you isn’t real.  You eject the empty magazine and physically reach over your shoulder with your other hand to grab a new clip out of your virtual backpack, slip it into the gun, pull back on the slide – not button presses mind you, but physical hand gestures – and then quickly aim (actually raising your arm, no thumbstick or mouse movement) and let off several shots at the zombie to fell it.  And yeah, don’t be surprised to feel an elevated pulse or quickened breath after dealing with an intense scene.  The immersion is just crazy amazing.   And it’s really easy to forget yourself and try to lean on a bannister or a table and get a sudden rude reminder that there’s nothing really there to support you.

Of all your senses, most notably touch is missing.  You can’t feel the wall or door that blocks your way, objects that you pick up have no weight to them and what you always feel underfoot is the familiar floor of your home.  Each of these do break the illusion, remind you that you’re in a simulation.  But just sight, sound and natural physical gestures go a long ways to providing an amazing array of virtual experiences: from defending a castle against animated invaders by shooting arrows with a virtual bow to using a giant slingshot to aim and launch talking cannonballs for maximum destruction in a giant warehouse in Valve’s The Lab, sitting in the cockpit of various airplanes, flying over detailed renderings of any part of the entire world and through live simulated weather in Microsoft’s new Flight Simulator, exploring the frightening dystopian world of Half-Life: Alyx, fighting off walking zombies and leaping headcrabs, or simply walking around the Mos Eisley Cantina from Star Wars or the streets and shops of Stormwind from World of Warcraft.

Okay, how about some video…

I’ve been blown away by what it’s like to experience virtual reality right now and I’ve been itching to share the experience with friends over the past few months, but of course we can’t get together with the pandemic still going strong.  So I’ve put together a video to share some of the experiences – even though a video can’t come anywhere close to conveying what it’s like to actually be immersed in virtual reality.  It’s the same difference as actually physically being somewhere versus watching a video recording of someone else being there, but here goes anyway:


A collection of VR experiences

What I demonstrate in that video is the default Steam VR home environment, Google Earth VR, MS Flight Simulator, Valve’s The Lab, Half Life: Alyx, I Expect You to Die, Superhot VR, a World of Warcraft environment and a bunch of Steam VR environments: Enterprise bridge, Hobbit house, Mos Eisley Cantina, Sno Champ and a robot boxing ring.

There’s still so much more to try though: Asseto Corsa car racing sim, Star Trek Bridge Crew co-op simulation, The Room VR puzzle game, Elite Dangerous space sim, The Climb 2 extreme climbing game, Earthlight NASA Spacewalk sim, Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes cooperative challenge, DCS World WWII flight battle sim, Fruit Ninja VR, Star Wars Squadrons space sim, No Man’s Sky, Fallout 4 VR, Borderlands 2 VR, Detached puzzle sim in space, Down the Rabbit Hole puzzle adventure, some short Portal-based experiences, lots of interesting environments to explore, etc.

See more here about Microsoft’s new Flight Simulator: Flying All Over the Planet


Hardware: HP Reverb G2 VR headset and controllers

It was the promise of VR with Microsoft’s new Flight Simulator that pushed me to look into getting a proper PC-based VR system.  I’ve tried a couple of inexpensive headset shells in the past that let you use your phone’s display and it’s motion tracking ability to get a taste of VR, but that was nothing like this.

Comparison of headset image quality from a YouTube video

What I decided to buy was the new HP Reverb G2 based on its incredibly high resolution displays: 2160 x 2160 for each eye.  The result is that you can’t see the pixels or any sort of “looking through a screen door” effect and the image quality is much improved over older headsets, particularly in the center portion of your view.

That’s a challenge with all VR headsets though: the need for lenses to project the image so that your eyes are focusing on an image a meter or two away rather than the actual physical display that’s only a couple of centimeters away.  This lens introduces chromatic distortions that make the outer areas much less clear than the center portion.  In addition, to leave room for eyeglass wearers, the lenses and displays need to be mounted a little bit away and this in turn limits the apparent field of view.  You end up feeling like you’re looking through ski goggles or some very wide binoculars.  Different headsets will make different trade-offs in lens quality and field-of-view versus expense.  HP here has managed to get some very high resolution displays with decent lenses into a fairly inexpensive full kit.

The audio on this headset is great too, borrowing the speaker design from Valve’s more expensive Index headset: the speakers sit completely off of your ears, unlike headphones, adding to the overall comfort.

The Reverb’s controllers are a bit of a compromise though: in order to eliminate the need for externally mounted tracking modules, the Reverb G2 has four outward-facing cameras to track the position of the controllers.  It works okay, but it definitely has blind spots and can’t always tell where the controllers are.  Plus these Windows Mixed Reality-style controllers aren’t able to track individual finger positions like the Valve Index controllers.  Even better, the Index controllers strap around your palm, leaving you free to make grasping motions without having to hold on to the controllers.

I’m using the HP Reverb G2 with my 2019 16″ MacBook Pro and an external GPU case, first for a 5700 XT but now a 6800 XT, one of the latest high-powered graphics cards.  To use the Reverb, I have to boot into Windows (via Boot Camp, doesn’t work under Parallels) but it works well and provides access to all of the many Steam VR-compatible titles as well as Oculus/Rift-exclusive titles via Revive.

Other Hardware: Valve Index headset and controllers

I’ve now had the opportunity to try the older and more expensive Valve Index system.  It has a much lower resolution 1440 x 1600 for each eye and it definitely shows in comparison to the Reverb G2.  There’s a fairly obvious “screen door” effect where you can see the fine grid of pixels and things just aren’t as clear and crisp.  On the other hand, it can display a wider field of view than the Reverb G2, which is nice.  It was also interesting to discover that the Reverb G2 is more comfortable to wear than the older Valve Index.  It’s lighter and more secure on your head without being tight and it doesn’t cramp your nose.  One thing I prefer on the Valve Index though is the ability to adjust the field-of-view by turning a dial to move the lenses closer or farther away.

The Valve Index depends on a set of external base stations to track the controllers and help track the headset – which certainly isn’t as convenient as systems that do “inside out” tracking from the headset itself.  In addition, I wasn’t aware that the base stations emit a constant high frequency whine.  Initially this was very bothersome but this seems to have improved with a firmware update and isn’t noticeable anymore.

It’s actually possible to hack together a system for using the Valve Index controllers with other headsets (like my Reverb G2).  This can give you better hand tracking and full finger tracking but it’s pretty fiddly and requires a lot of setup – plus I’ve found that the training and calibration that allows this hack to work can get messed up and require reconfiguring things all over again.  At times I’ve gotten frustrated with trying to make it work and just gone back to the original Reverb G2 controllers, no hacks or calibration required.

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Flying All Over the Planet

I’ve been enjoying the new Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020 which features the ability to fly anywhere in the world with often amazing displays of detail and realism, including live weather effects.  If you haven’t seen it yet, here’s several written reviews (IGN, Polygon, Gamerant) and a few showcase videos:

Approaching Santa Cruz in a Daher TBM 930
(notice all the detail in the cockpit: sunlight, reflections in the windshield, etc.)

I’m running MS Flight Simulator on my 16″ 2019 MacBook Pro, an ultrawide LG monitor (3440 x 1440) and a Logitech G Pro Flight Yoke system with rudder pedals.  (A yoke is much easier to fly with than the keyboard controls.)  It’s a pretty immersive experience:

(For all of these YouTube videos, you’ll want to go full screen
and force the highest resolution, not just leave it on “auto”.)

Be aware that right now, as with all the newest graphic cards, every flight yoke and joystick is pretty difficult to find anywhere at normal retail prices ($165-ish) as the release of this game (and the pandemic) have driven them out-of-stock everywhere.

Even with the whole world available to explore, it’s particularly fun to fly around places that you know very well from the ground.  I’ve created a couple of longer videos of such flights – here’s a tour of the Santa Cruz area, including the boardwalk, downtown, Scotts Valley, Felton and north along the coast as far as Año Nuevo:

Some locations (like Santa Cruz above) benefit from detailed photogrammetry data providing lots of realistic detail. Other locations get carefully handcrafted buildings and objects (particularly at select airports), while the rest of the planet gets more generic textures and topographical information from satellite data and auto-generated details like trees and buildings. For example, the generic buildings populating the ghost town of Bodie are very out of place in my little tour of the Eastern Sierra – from Bishop to Mammoth and on to Mono Lake and Bodie:

Lots of folks are already making add-ons that you can drop in to enhance the rendering of a particular location or add a particular plane.  Here’s one great index of available add-ons for MS Flight Simulator.


The 16″ MacBook Pro (2.4GHz 8‑core Intel Core i9) can actually manage to run MS Flight Simulator on my ultrawide monitor with just the laptop’s built-in AMD Radeon Pro 5500M GPU but at lower Medium level settings. This game can be very CPU and even network intensive (the world does not fit on your hard drive) so the game can bog down even if your GPU has cycles to spare.

For higher quality settings, I’m using a Red Devil Radeon 5700 XT graphics card in an external GPU enclosure (connected via Thunderbolt) running MSFS 2020 on Windows 10 via Apple Boot Camp.  This setup allows for something between High-End and Ultra settings at 3440 x 1440 resolution.

Update (Jan 2021): I’m since been able to get one of the new, next generation GPU’s: an overclocked Radeon 6800 XT and I’m now able to run smoothly at even greater than “Ultra” settings from my 2019 MacBook Pro.  It looks fantastic!

Note that you’ll likely need to go through a bit of hassle to successfully configure these AMD graphics cards under Boot Camp.  See the egpu.io forums and bootcampdrivers.com for help. The Nvidia cards don’t require workarounds for Boot Camp but they’re not supported at all on macOS, whereas the AMD cards work under macOS without doing anything.

And now in virtual reality: I’ve also picked up a very high resolution HP Reverb G2 VR headset which makes for a truly amazing and engrossing experience.  With a proper VR headset, you get that incredible, brain-fooling trick of virtual reality immersion – of seeing and hearing only the virtual world around you, no matter which way you look.  With the Reverb’s incredibly high 4320 x 2160 resolution, I can’t run at the highest graphics settings (even with that new GPU) but it doesn’t matter – that feeling of immersion is so captivating – feeling like you’re actually sitting in the cockpit.  You’ve got to directly experience it though to believe it.  Watching a video recording shown on a fixed screen in front of you can never convey it.  I’ve written more about experiencing virtual reality here.

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“Have you played Atari today?”

A little while ago, after reading “Ready Player One” again (Spielberg is making a movie!) and after seeing a couple of tech talks by old Atari game programmers, I was lamenting that I sold my old Atari VCS so many years ago.  Well, Darlene jumped on this comment, found a bundle someone was selling on eBay and surprised me with an early birthday gift.  Yup, an old Atari VCS/2600 (four switch version), a set of controllers and a bundle of game cartridges. Sweet!  (I think my brother and I actually had the six-switch, Sears-rebranded version, but still very cool!) Thanks, Darlene!

I immediately had to go fill out the set of 40 cartridges with a couple of other games I remember us playing a lot.  Of course then was the challenge of hooking it up: the Atari outputs an analog RF TV signal… on an RCA-plug cable.  You can use an adapter like this one to go from RCA plug to coax TV cable input.  I don’t have a TV tuner, so rather than pulling a VCR out of a box in a closet, I hooked it up via my old USB EyeTV tuner/video converter to my MacBook – success!

IMG_4059 IMG_4052

Yeah, you can play any of these games via emulation on a modern computer, or even a smartphone/iPad, but there’s something very different about jamming the physical cartridge into the old physical console and handling that classic Atari joystick.  (And having to use cotton swabs and alcohol to clean the contacts on all of the Activision cartridges to get them to work again!)

It’s been fun to pick these up and rediscover old visual/procedural memories, like the admittedly-simple path through the Adventure maze.  Some titles are only vaguely familiar until you plug them in and see the game again and then go “aha!!”

So… to paraphrase Atari’s old marketing… have you played your Atari today?

to_be_continued

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Red Alert! Shields Up!

Got some friends together on Sunday to try out Artemis — a “spaceship bridge simulator” game where each person takes on a different role and we work together to successfully complete the mission: helm, weapons, science, engineering, communications, command.  We did have some “technical difficulties” and some “minor disasters” (our ship sometimes completely destroyed) but everybody enjoyed the experience — it was a lot of geeky fun!

 IMG_0332

Darlene was busy working but she was there in spirit — particularly after she sent a photo of herself in uniform.  (Yes, those boots may not be “Starfleet regulation” — but I wholeheartedly approve!)

IMG_0327

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The Wrath of Denethenor

A print magazine advertisement for the Wrath of Denethenor from around 1986.

This is a fantasy adventure game I designed and wrote for the Apple II in 1984-85.

I began writing the game in my last year of high school and finished it up during my first year of college. A friend from high school, Kevin Christiansen, helped out by building the graphics routines for the Apple II version.  At Sierra On-Line’s request, I ported the game to the Commodore 64 — which was only possible since it shared the same processor family — but which required redoing all of the graphics routines.

Continue reading »

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Geek Club Meetup – Arcade Gaming

Pictures from a meetup with “The Geek Club” for “California Extreme” – a terrible name for a video game arcade convention:

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Ski Weekend in Tahoe

Another fun ski weekend with the Bay Area Outdoor Adventure Club – at Squaw Valley and Northstar.  Click through for the full gallery of images — including some amusing video clips of Matt and Rajin trying to knock each other out in Wii Boxing:

  

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Denethenor Lives!

— On 11/10/06 11:16 PM, space aliens may have forced Steve M. to write:

 Hi Chris,

I wanted to let you know how much I enjoyed Wrath of Denethenor. It was my favorite game for the Apple IIe. I got the IIe when I was in 7th grade, more than 18 years ago. I played it for hours (until the wee hours) and eventually finished it. I really had a lot of fun with it.

I have a few confessions to make though….I remember figuring out that I could cheat the towns by using a “anger management disk” when leaving a town or social area after attacking and robbing them. If I swapped the floppy right before exiting the town, the disk would store their anger and tempers towards my character and when re-entering the town, I would insert my all is good “clean” disk…and they would be happy to see me. Invariably I would just rob them again, which didn’t always seem fair…and they would be none the wiser the next time. I racked up a lot of resources that way. I felt pretty proud of myself that I’d figured that one out.

One more thing, I didn’t pay for the game L I downloaded it from some AE/Elite board on my 1200 baud modem at midnight some school night no doubt when it was late enough that I could use the phone like for multiple hours for downloading. Squinty O’ Toole’s Elite BBS, or something similar. How times have changed with the Internet. I was in 7th grade I think… How much was the game in the store? I’d like to pay you for it now. Let me know and I’ll paypal you the cost. Seriously J

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“I say let his WRATH be REBORN!”

Date: June 12, 2006 4:34:21 PM PDT
Subject: I say let his WRATH be REBORN!!!!

Hello Christopher,

Found your website on yahoo doing a search (just for the hell of it) for Wrath of Denethenor – a game that I still enjoy and that ranks high on my list…

ULTIMA III: EXODUS
FINAL FANTASY VII
WRATH OF DENETHENOR

Every other game I have played (I’m 33 now and still enjoy RPGs but hell, they don’t pay the bills!) just is in my mind either a cheap immitation, or just don’t do it quite the same.

I still have my old Apple IIc (the damn thing still works!) with working copies of Wrath– and Uhh… I just beat it again a few weeks ago, except now I’m just too damn good at it.

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Denethor or Denethenor?

Hey, Chris!

I just came across your website in the most bizarre of ways.. let me explain.

First let me say I was a huge fan of your game “Wrath of Denethenor” way back in the day when I was living in Vermont and using my old Apple ][+ exclusively (I still have it, and it still works, if you can believe it).  Having been completely blown away by the Ultima series, I decided to try your game, and loved it.  So, hats off to you for that.

Now fast forward – to what?  20 years?  Has it really been that long?  Wow…

I was recently on the D.C. metro heading to work, reading the Lord of the Rings “Return of the King” for the first time ever, and the character “Denethor” was introduced.  Soon after I read about “Denethor’s wrath” referring to his attitude regarding the declining state of his army, his son, and his kingdom in the midst of a war. I thought to myself – wait a minute, that sounds familiar… except that the arch-villain was “DenethENor”.  Coincidence?

So out of sheer curiosity I googled Denethenor, came across your site, and figured I’d ask you, introduce myself, and let you know there are people out there who, 20 years later, have not forgotten that wily bastard who comes after you. ;)

Cheers to you my friend, a true pioneer of the early era.

Darren

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Scenes from Azeroth

Click through for a gallery of images from exploring Azeroth – the world of “World of Warcraft” in 2005:

  

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Yay, Fan Mail!

— On 9/15/04 11:31 AM, space aliens may have forced Gordon to write:

 Hi Chris!

Just wanted to thank you for the great game and the memories that went along with it…my friends and I loved this game.

Just out of curiosity…why did you never make any other games? Your game albeit looking somewhat like Ultima very original in many ways (animated characters and other touches).  Have you made any shareware or hobby games since then?

Thanks in advance!

Gordon

Hi Gordon,

Thanks for writing and I’m glad to hear you enjoyed it.

I never wrote another game because I’ve been doing other software engineering full time since college (on FileMaker Pro 1.0-7.0) and I’m just not motivated to spend that much more time on the computer than I already do outside of work!  (As you can see, I can’t even keep up on my personal email!)

The only shareware I did was a module for Now Software’s “Now Fun!” title, but what I did was just a utility to customize the colors on the old Macintosh System 8 — I think, or was it 7?!  Anyway, that’s all.  FileMaker keeps me pretty busy!

Thanks again,

Chris

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David’s Birthday

Click through for a gallery of pictures from a little gaming party for David’s birthday at my place:

 

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Wrath of Denethenor – Cheat myself back

Hiya.  I was wondering if you knew (or remembered) the offsets (and such) in the Apple ][ code for WoD to well, cheat.
I got very far into WoD when I was 16 years old (I’m 33 now!).
Somehow, my game disks (one of them?) became corrupted, and I couldn’t finish the game.  I recently downloaded an Apple ][ emulator and found roms to your game!
(Is this ok?)  Anyway, I’d like to cheat myself back to where I was, or at least remove the stamina reduction over time functionality and such.  The “Applewin” program seems to have a decent debugger.. though I’m racking my brain to remember 6502 assembly language. =)
I know it’s been a LONG time, but if you remember anything, I’d appreciate it.
Thanks for writing such a great game.  Playing it again brings back some great memories.
-V-

 

Geez… talk about a backlog of old email….  sorry for the (yikes!) year long delay!Thanks for writing and thanks for your interest in WoD.

Here are some of the key offsets from the character file.  (No, I most definitely am not recalling this from memory!!)  I believe all the values were in BCD (binary coded decimal) — in other words, 255 would be represented in hex as “0255” not “00FF”.  hit points: bytes 26 & 27,  stamina: 28 && 29,  gold: 30 & 31

Enjoy!

– Chris

Hehe, I was wondering why you never responded. ;)

Thanks for the answer!

Take care,

-V-

ps. I have some great memories of some of the first games I’ve ever really loved when I was just getting into computers in my teens.  Thanks for one of them.

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Wrath of Denethenor

> Hey!
>
> I loved that game on the ’64. Almost finished it. Apparently, the only
> thing I didn’t try was speaking “uren duir esex” from RIGHT NEXT to
> Denethenor. :( Tried it from further back… I was under the impression
> from “choose your steps wisely” and “approach like a whisper” and “the
> unspoken spell” that it had to do with a step pattern, and hitting the
> “say” button, then f7 to make it say “nothing.” Oh well. It was a fun game
> in any case.
>
> I’m also a Mac dude, so have had experience with old Claris works. Did see
> your name in the credits… :D
>
> Ethan Larson

Hi Ethan,

Thanks for your message.  I’m glad to hear you enjoyed the game!  You certainly were awfully close to finishing it — just a couple of steps away!

Thanks again,
Chris

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